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Hermit: Schizoid Personality Disorder

Uploaded 4/26/2011, approx. 2 minute read

My name is Sam Vaknin. I am the author of Malignant Self-Love, Narcissism Revisited.

Patients with schizoid personality disorder, or schizoids for short, enjoy nothing. They seemingly never experience pleasure. This is known as anhedonia. Even their nearest interiors describe them as automata, robots, or machines.

But the schizoid is not depressed or dysphoric. He is merely indifferent. Schizoids are uninterested in social relationships, and they are bored and puzzled by interpersonal reactions and interactions. They are incapable of intimacy, and they have a very limited range of emotions and affect.

Rarely does the schizoid express feelings, either negative, such as anger, or positive, such as happiness. Schizoids never pursue an opportunity to develop a close relationship.

Schizoids are mostly aloof, bland, stunted, flat, and zombie-like. Sexually, they are neutered. They derive no satisfaction from belonging to a close-knit group, a family, a church, workplace, neighborhood, or nation. They rarely marry or have children.

Schizoids are loners. Given the option, they invariably pursue solitary activities or hobbies. Inevitably, they prefer mechanical or abstract tasks and jobs that require such skills and are grounded, belongeless, in the isolation that they seek.

Many computer hackers, crackers, and programmers are schizoids, for instance, as are some mathematicians and theoretical physicists.

Schizoids are inflexible in their reactions to changing life circumstances and developments, both adverse and opportune. Faced with stress, schizoids may disintegrate, decompensate, and experience brief psychotic episodes or even a depressive illness.

Schizoids have few friends or confidence. They trust only first-degree relatives, but even so, they maintain no close bonds or associations, not even with their immediate family.

Schizoids pretend to be indifferent to praise, criticism, disagreement, and corrective advice, though deep inside, they are not.

These are creatures of habit, frequently succumbing to rigid, predictable, and narrowly restricted routines and schedules.

From the outside, the schizoid's life looks rather less and adrift.

Like people with Asperger's syndrome, schizoids fail to respond appropriately to social cues and rarely reciprocate gestures or facial expressions such as smiles.

As the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual puts it, schizoids seem socially inept or superficial and self-absorbed.

Be sure to watch the video which compares narcissists to schizoids. It is available in my channel.

If you enjoyed this article, you might like the following:

Narcissist: Socially-anxious, Schizoid

Schizoid personality disorder is characterized by a lack of interest in social relationships and interactions, limited emotional expression, and a preference for solitary activities. Schizoids are often described as robotic and uninterested in social bonding. While there are similarities between schizoid and narcissistic personality disorders, the two are distinct in that schizoids are uninterested in bonding, while narcissists are both uninterested and incapable due to their lack of empathy and grandiosity. Narcissism is not about self-love, but rather a broken ego or self that withdraws from society to protect itself.


Schizoid Personality and Schizoid Narcissism Bible (Compilation)

The schizoid personality is characterized by a preference for solitude, a lack of interest in social relationships, and a limited range of emotions. Schizoids are often perceived as aloof, indifferent, and uninterested in both sexual and social interactions. They are typically self-contained and may be seen as emotionally cold or flat. While some individuals may choose a schizoid lifestyle as a rational response to modern society's demands, for others, it may be a manifestation of a pathological condition. The schizoid personality should not be confused with narcissism, although both may share certain features, such as disrupted object relations. However, the schizoid recognizes the externality of objects but has difficulty emotionally investing in them, while the narcissist does not perceive objects as external and instead forms relationships with internal objects. Schizoid behavior can be reactive and is sometimes misdiagnosed as narcissism. The schizoid's detachment can be misconstrued as a cry for help or a sign of helplessness, and their self-sufficiency can be misinterpreted as strength. Relationships with schizoids can be challenging due to their asexuality and emotional detachment.


Lonely World, Schizoid Future (and Sex)

The schizoid core, characterized by a lack of identity and a void, is at the foundation of personality and character pathologies. Society is gravitating towards a schizoid solution, with people preferring solitude and avoiding interactions with others. The schizoid world is becoming more narcissistic, psychopathic, and autoerotic, with sex being the last remaining vestige of human contact. The future will be a society in flux, with ad hoc self-assembling networks and no concept of institutions, intimate relationships, or politics.


Solitude is a Rational Choice

Schizoids avoid meaningful relationships and do not derive emotional benefits from associating with people. Narcissists rationalize their schizoid conduct and believe that being alone is the only logical choice in today's hostile world. The breakdown and dysfunction of social structures and institutions are masked by technologies that provide similar truths and confabulations. The idolatry of the individual has resulted in malignant forms of narcissism that are prevalent and all-pervasive.


Protecting Us From Ourselves Defense Mechanisms

Insight from psychoanalysis suggests that we are our own worst enemies due to our capacity for self-deceit. Defense mechanisms are widely thought to be the main instruments of self-deceit, and they serve to separate internal reality from external reality in order to reduce anxiety. These defenses can be successful or unsuccessful, and they play a role in normal psychic structure formation. Additionally, there are various types of defenses, and they can evolve and transform as the ego matures.


No Intimacy Without Personal Boundaries (Q&A)

Intimacy skills are inextricably linked to the capacity to maintain and enforce personal boundaries. People with personality disorders don't have personal boundaries, which makes it impossible for them to do intimacy. Intimacy is a balancing act between separateness and togetherness, sharing commonalities and having a private life separate from the partner. The younger generations have tremendous deficiencies in relationship and intimacy skills because they don't have the chance to experience even intimacy in relationships.


Issues and Goals in the Treatment of Dependent Personality Disorder (Codependence, or Codependency)

Professor Sam Vaknin discusses codependency, its various forms, and its impact on individuals. He explains the different categories of codependency, such as those related to abandonment anxiety, fear of losing control, vicarious codependents, and counter-dependence. He also delves into the psychological and emotional aspects of codependency, its roots in childhood experiences, and the potential for overcoming it through therapy and self-help.


Relationship Obsessive–compulsive Disorder (ROCD): Tormenting Doubts re: Partners and Relationships

Professor Sam Vaknin discusses Relationship Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (ROCD), a form of OCD that focuses on intimate relationships. ROCD can manifest in two ways: relationship-centered, where individuals obsess over their own feelings towards their partner and the rightness of the relationship, and partner-focused, where individuals obsess over their partner's perceived flaws. ROCD can be debilitating and negatively impact relationships and overall life. Treatment for ROCD typically involves cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and, in some cases, medication.


Never Forgive Infidelity, Cheating!

Public intellectuals and coaches who validate ignorance and biases for profit are criticized. The speaker argues that cheating in relationships is never therapeutic and reflects underlying psychological issues. They distinguish consensual non-monogamous arrangements from deceptive affairs, asserting that forgiving such betrayal indicates mental illness. Mentally healthy individuals are advised to end relationships after infidelity, and those who don't are deemed mentally impaired. The speaker dismisses justifications for cheating and urges seeking therapy for considering staying in a deceptive relationship.


Falsify Reality, Deny Yourself: Primitive Defense Mechanisms (NEW Intro+Compilation)

Psychological defense mechanisms are designed to prevent inner conflict and maintain comfort with oneself. They reduce anxiety and prevent disintegration by falsifying reality and denying or repressing undesirable parts of oneself. Splitting, projection, and projective identification are key mechanisms that falsify reality and manage self-perception. Splitting involves seeing oneself as all good and others as all bad, avoiding guilt or shame. Projection attributes one's own unacceptable traits to others, while projective identification goes further, inducing others to behave in ways that confirm the projection. Reaction formation involves adopting behaviors that are the opposite of one's unacceptable impulses, such as a latent homosexual displaying homophobia. These mechanisms are crucial for internal tranquility but can distort reality and interpersonal perceptions.

Transcripts Copyright © Sam Vaknin 2010-2024, under license to William DeGraaf
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